Barack Obama: Executive Clemency for Dr. Mutulu Shakur

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You can sign this petition here:

Barack Obama: Executive Clemency for Dr. Mutulu Shakur

Family and Friends of Dr. Mutulu Shakur

dr-mutulu-shakur-healer-of-the-peopleThe week of October 10th, a petition for clemency for Dr. Mutulu Shakur was submitted to President Barack Obama. Please sign on here to show your support.

The acts of which Dr. Shakur stands convicted were committed in the context of a movement some forty to fifty years ago seeking equal treatment of black people who, it is widely recognized today, were suffering catastrophically from disenfranchisement, poverty and exclusion from many of the fundamental necessities that make life worth living. Black school children were being killed in church bombings. Black and other civil rights leaders were targeted for assassination. Law enforcement, through the COINTELPRO program, infiltrated a wide range of organizations and civil rights groups disrupting their activities and, as Congressional investigation later discovered, often causing violent reactions. In that era, black youth were paralyzed with fear that smothered their dreams, they doubted their life expectancy, and were forced to submit to abuse, runaway or challenge the threat.

Dr. Shakur has served over thirty years in custody, been unjustly denied parole eight times in a documented discriminatory manner, taken full responsibility for his actions, served as a force for good and alternative dispute mechanisms throughout his decades of incarceration, is an elder with multiple health complications, and has a loving family that needs him, even moreso after his former wife, Afeni Shakur, passed away in May.  Upon release he will continue to inspire people to seek self-improvement through peaceful and constructive means, as he has done while incarcerated, as he did with his late son Tupac.

In his own words, “For many years I have been a staunch advocate for the establishment of a truth and reconciliation process to address issues of racial and economic disparities. I have been influenced by examples in South Africa, Latin America, Ireland and here in the United States of efforts at restorative justice through the pursuit of truth and reconciliation …

I cannot undo the violence and tragedy that took place more than thirty years ago. But for several decades while incarcerated I have dedicated myself to being a healer, spreading a message of reconciliation and justice, and playing a positive role in the lives of those I come into contact with, in and out of prison …

This country is not the same country it was at the time of my conviction and I have lived long enough to understand the changes the country and I have undergone. I will always care about freedom and equality for black Americans, marginalized people and the lower classes in this country and abroad.


Freedom Archives 522 Valencia Street San Francisco, CA 94110 415 863.9977

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FROM MALCOLM X COMMEMORATION COMMITTEEgreetings

as you know, petitions are being sent to Barack Obama before he leaves office seeking clemency for Dr. Mutulu Shakur. we need 100,000 in order for Mutulu’s petition to be considered by Obama..
 
last week, i learned that 
1.    Oscar Lopez Rivera had 108,000 signatures
2.    Leonard Peltier had 64,000 signatures
3.    Mutulu Shakur had 5,000 signatures
 
since then, the signatures for Mutulu have been growing, but still now more than ever, Mutulu needs our help to bring him home…i believe we can do better by this Freedom Fighter who has given decades of his and his Family’s life to the Black Freedom struggle…
 
on behalf of Mutulu and his Family, please join us by SIGNING and SHARING his petition…AND if you TWITTER, please do and SHARE for Dr. Mutulu Shakur
 —
FREE THE LAND!
Let’s “Dream, Rise Organize” to
FREE all Political Prisoners & Prisoners of War
The Malcolm X Commemoration Committee

dequi kioni-sadiki
chair

P.O. Box 380-122

Brooklyn, New York  11238

718-512-5008
website: www.MXCC519.org 

#OmaliTaughtMe Political Study: Black Power Since the 60’s

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The first African Liberation Day, May 27, 1972, featured simultaneous demonstrations in Washington,D.C., San Francisco, and the Caribbean that drew a total of sixty thousand demonstrators in support of indigenous rule in Africa. This photo is from the Washington, D.C., demonstration.©Washington Post; District of Columbia Public Library.

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Albert Cleage addressing the Walk for Freedom, Detroit, June 23, 1963. Walter P. Reuther Library.

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Amiri Baraka, an effective local black power organizer and mobilizer, addresses an audience at Howard University in Washington, D.C., April 25, 1973. ©Washington Post; District of Columbia Public Library.

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The Black Panther party’s Revolutionary People’s Constitutional Convention, Washington, D.C., November 1970. ©Washington Post; District of Columbia Public Library.